2001, continued...

 Taking a break from the dig around where the chimney used to be.
 

In order to continue this digging, the old brick chimney had to come out. As is so often the case with 'old brick chimneys', it was built into the house, literally. Floor joists were sawed off and studs ripped out to make a passage for the chimney, which ultimately became part of the supporting structure of the house. Removing it was relatively easy, but attention had to be paid to replacing lost support...the house had settled, and was quite literally draped around the chimney, which had not settled. First, the chimney was replaced by a metal B-vent to exhaust the furnace and water heater, then up to the roof to start knocking it down, one brick at a time. Materials for the firepit! Another in a long line of recycled materials...

 

 New metal B-vent installed to exhaust the hot stuff. The wall behind it is about to be trashed in a rather ugly fashion...

 6x6 timber cantilevered into place below the fridge and stove, in order that the Gravel Gourmet may continue working. The chimney once did this job, sorta. Good thing Santa Claus didn't also lend mass to the equation....
 

 

 A view down the chimney hole, Estwing Hammer for scale. Ignore the dirty socks.

 

 

Meanwhile the new footing had cured, with tender baths of water twice a day to help in the hydration process, so now construction of the 16-foot wall section could commence. With the chimney removed the dig could now progress past the old coal bunker and under the kitchen...keeping in mind, of course, that the structural nightmare created by the chimney removal had to be accounted for. No problem, said Mike, with his forest of jackposts at the ready...

 Rich Fobert lays in a stud on the 16-foot east wall. This one promised to be a grunt when it came time to stand it up in place...
 

 

 As is so often the case while doing this work, I forgot to record the wonderous leverage methods used in standing the behemoth up single-handedly.

More....

 

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